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Table 2 Regional distribution of S type-1 and S type-2 lineages and malaria vector prevalence

From: Plasmodium vivax lineages: geographical distribution, tandem repeat polymorphism, and phylogenetic relationship

Regions Major malaria parasites and vectors Sample (n) S type-2(%) S type-1(%) Both (%)
India      
Delhi Pf & Pv, An. stephensi, An. culicifacies 52 50 48.08 1.92
Nadiad Pf & Pv, An. culicifacies, An. stephensi 52 55.76 42.3 1.92
Panna Pf & Pv, An. culicifacies, An. fluvitalis 27 66.66 33.34 -
Raipur Pf, An. culicifacies, An. fluvitalis 13 15.38 84.62 -
Rourkela Pf, An. fluvitalis, An. culicifacies 39 23.07 76.93 -
Goa Pf & Pv, An. stephensi 51 76.47 23.52 -
Chennai Pv, An. stephensi 48 58.33 39.58 2.08
Kamrup Pf & Pv, An. minimus, An. dirus 54 22.23 77.77 -
Car Nicobar Pf & Pv, An. sandaicus 18 83.33 16.67 -
Thailand      
Mae Sot Pf & Pv, An. dirus 36 11.11 88.89 -
Colombia      
Andean region Pf & Pv, An. albimanus, An. darlingi 10 0 100 -
Pacific region Pf & Pv, An. albimanus, An. neivai 10 90 10 -
Caribbean region Pf & Pv, An. albimanus, An. nuñeztovari 10 30 70 -
Total   420 46.19 53.09 0.72
  1. Both lineages' global distribution contradicted Li et al's Old and New World lineages hypothesis; however, the sympatric distribution of lineages was not sufficient to refute the two-lineage hypothesis; rather, understanding their genetic relatedness would seem to be more important. Ninety-six single-clone isolates (48 S type-1 and 48 S type-2) were selected and characterized using a panel of mini-satellite markers to unravel genetic relatedness between P. vivax lineages.