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Table 3 Effects of prenatal exposure to Plasmodium falciparum, gravidity, Infant birth weight, age of the mother at delivery, and season of birth to clinical malaria episodes: binary logistic regression

From: Prenatal exposure to Plasmodium falciparum increases frequency and shortens time from birth to first clinical malaria episodes during the first two years of life: prospective birth cohort study

Factors BLR-univariate analysis BLR-multivariate analysis
OR (CI 95 %) p value AOR (CI 95 %) p value
In utero exposure to Plasmodium falciparum
Non-exposure to P. falciparum in utero 1 (–) 1 (–)
Exposure to P. falciparum in utero 4.632 (2.248–9.541) p < 0.01 4.791 (2.21–10.38) p < 0.01
Gravidity of mothers
Primigravidity 1 (–) 1 (–)
Multigravidity 0.752 (0.4–1.415) 0.372 0.973 (0.475–1.990) 0.939
Infant birth weight
Normal birth weight 1 (–) 1 (–)
Low birth weight 0.441 (0.189–1.031) 0.059 0.556 (0.209–1.477) 0.239
Age of mothers (years)
40–50 1 1 (–)
<18 1.833 (0.626–5367) 0.269 2.120 (0.672–6.687) 0.20
18–28 1.100 (0.329–3.677) 0.877 1.196 (0.328–4.361) 0.786
29–39 1.615 (0.779–3.351) 0.198 2.013 (0.913–4.438) 0.083
Infant season of birth
Dry season 1.0 1 (–)
Wet season 0.736 (0.311–1.741) 0.485 0.917(0.338–1.2.484) 0.864
  1. Prenatal exposure to Plasmodium falciparum significantly associated with clinical malaria episodes in univariate and Multivariate analysis (p < 0.01)
  2. OR Odds Ratio, AOR Adjusted Odds Ratio, CI Confidence interval, BLR Binary logistic regression