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Table 1 Maternal characteristics during pregnancy, Salavan Province, Laos, 2014

From: Prevalence of malaria in pregnancy in southern Laos: a cross-sectional survey

  Community survey N = 205 Hospital survey N = 331
n (%) or mean (95 % CI)
Maternal age (years) 24.9 (24.0–25.7) 25.0 (24.4–25.7)
Gravidity
 G1–G2 122 (59.5) 220 (66.5)
 G3+ 83 (40.5) 111 (33.5)
Ethnicity
 Lao Loum 204 (99.5) 266 (80.4)
 Lao Theung 1 (0.5) 65 (19.6)
Place of living/delivery
 Vapi 205 (100.0) 44 (13.3)
 Toumlan   40 (11.8)
 Salavan   248 (74.9)
Educationa   NA
 No formal education 25 (12.8)  
 Primary school 103 (52.5)  
 Secondary school or higher 68 (34.7)  
Number of ANC visits during this pregnancy 1.4 (1.1–1.6) 3.8 (3.6–4.1)
Iron supplementationa 103 (50.2) 310/330 (93.9)
Folic acid supplementationa 0 (100.0) 258/327 (78.9)
Gestational hypertensiona 1/204 (0.5) 11 (3.3)
Tobacco use NA 38 (11.5)
Went to the forest during the current pregnancy 170 (82.9) 141 (42.6)
Bed net possession 204 (99.5) 307 (92.8)
Bed net use the night before the survey/admission 204 (99.5) 305 (92.1)
Any malaria episode during pregnancya 17/204 (8.3) 7/330 (2.1)
Gestational age (weeks of gestation)a 23 (22–25) 38 (38-38)
Maternal Hb level (g/dL)a 10.8 (10.6–11.0) 11.4 (11.3–11.6)
Maternal anaemia (Hb < 11 g/dL)a 106 (51.7) 112/327 (34.3)
  1. ANC antenatal care, Hb haemoglobin
  2. aN = 331 women at delivery, N = 205 during pregnancy, or indicated otherwise. Blood pressure was not recorded for one woman (community-level survey), history of malaria could not be determined in two women (one during the community-level survey and one during the facility-level survey), education level was not recorded in nine women who were recruited in the first three investigated villages in Vapi District, iron and folic acid supplementation could not been determined in, respectively, one and four women during the facility-level survey, and Hb level could not be measured in four women in Toumlane District Hospital because of a defective device