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Table 1 Responses for action on nets with different damage and repair attributes presented in the participatory activity

From: ‘For the poor, sleep is leisure’: understanding perceptions, barriers and motivators to mosquito net care and repair in southern Tanzania

Net ID Number of holes Hole sizesa Hole locationb Repairc Categoryd Common “would do” response Common “should do” response
1 1 “Size 2” Bottom No Good Repair and continue to use Repair and continue to use
2 1 “Size 2” Roof No Good Repair and continue to use Repair and continue to use
3 18 15 × “Size 1”, 3 × “Size 2” Mix No Damaged Discard; or use it for alternative purposes Repair and
4 9 8 × “Size 1”, 1 × “Size 3” “Size 1” top, “Size 3” bottom No Damaged Repair and continue to use Repair and continue to use
5 2 1 × “Size 2”, 1 × “Size 4” “Size 4” roof, “Size 2” bottom No Damaged Repair and continue to use Repair and continue to use
6 2 1 × “Size 2”, 1 × “Size 4” “Size 4” roof, “Size 2” bottom Partial (Size 4) Damaged Repair and continue to use Repair and continue to use
7 25 22 × “Size 1”, 1 × “Size 2”, 2 × “Size 3” Mix No Damaged Repair and continue to use; Discard; or use it for alternative purposes Repair and continue to use
  1. aHole size categories based on the WHO guidelines [10]: “Size 1”: smaller than a thumb (0.5–2 cm), “Size 2”: larger than a thumb but smaller than a fist (2–10 cm), “Size 3”: larger than a fist but smaller than a head (10–25 cm) and “Size 4”: larger than a head (> 25 cm)
  2. bEach side panel split into top half and bottom half
  3. cType of repair: Sewing with needle and thread (as per SNP BCC messaging)
  4. dPhysical damage categories based on total hole surface area [10]: good: < 79 cm2, Damaged: 80–789 cm2 and Too Torn: > 790 cm2