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Table 1 Summary of peer reviewed SMC cost and cost-effectiveness estimates

From: Cost-effectiveness of district-wide seasonal malaria chemoprevention when implemented through routine malaria control programme in Kita, Mali using fixed point distribution

Setting Delivery strategy Unit Cost/US $ (2016)a Cost–effectiveness ratiosb
Cost per round Cost per fully adherent childc
Financial Economic Financial Economic
Hohoe, Ghana
(Conteh et al. 2010)
DTD, 6 rounds, AS + AQ monthly – trial conditions
DTD, 6 rounds, AS + AQ monthly – modelled to district level
1.84 2.54 13.17
4.02
16.70
4.83
80.46 (66.18–94.81) per case averted
24.87 (22.63–27.36) per case averted
Basse, Gambia
(Bojang et al. 2011)
FPD, 3 rounds, SP + AQ monthly
DTD, 3 rounds, SP + AQ monthly
1.04
0.74
1.20
0.97
3.31
1.37
3.87
1.82
Not applicable
Jasikan, Ghana
(Patoulllard et al. 2012)
FPD, 3 rounds SP + AQ monthly
DTD, 3 rounds, SP + AQ monthly
2.93–3.09
2.65
3.65–3.79
3.46

9.37
8.32
Not undertaken
Upper West Region,
Ghana
(Nonvignon et al. 2016)
DTD, 4 rounds, SP + AQ at monthly     22.81 108.41 (101.01–123.01) per additional case avertedd
3339.97 (3112.03–3789.85)
per additional death averted
Bambey, Mbour, Fatick & Niakhar, Senegal
(Pitt et al., 2017)
DTD, 3 rounds SP + AQ monthly 0.55 0.65 1.65 1.96 Not undertaken
Burkina Faso, Chad, The Gambia, Guinea, Mali, Niger, and Nigeria (ACCESS-SMC Partnership, 2020) DTD and FPD (country dependent)
4 rounds SP + AQ monthly
0.91e 2.91–30.73 per case averted
119.63- 506.00 per severe case averted
533.56- 2256.92 per death averted
  1. DTD: Door to Door distribution, FPD: Fixed Point Distribution (Health facility, outreach or focal point in village)
  2. aCosts from Provider perspective and inflated from original source base year to 2016 using Inflation Calculator from U.S. Labor Department's Bureau of Labor Statistics on September 12, 2019
  3. bBased on intervention costs only
  4. cThe unit cost per round weighted by adherence levels
  5. dNonvignon et al. (2016) used a similar approach to this study (combined primary cost data with a transmission model to estimate cost-effectiveness)
  6. eAccording to the manuscript, ‘The weighted average cost of four treatments per child was obtained by dividing the total recurrent cost by the total number of doses administered divided by 4′ (p1834). This amounted to US $3.63, a calculation based on a multiple of treatment rounds that appears to exclude adherence. To obtain the cost per round, US $3.63 was divided by 4. Mali specific costs were not presented