Skip to main content

Table 4 Median price in US dollar (inter-quartile range) for an adult-equivalent treatment dose in the private sector (tablet formulation only), by anti-malarial type

From: Got ACTs? Availability, price, market share and provider knowledge of anti-malarial medicines in public and private sector outlets in six malaria-endemic countries

  Median $ (IQR)
  Most
Popular¹
First-line
quality-assured ACT
Oral Artemisinin Monotherapy
Benin2 0.65 a (0.43, 1.08) N = 462 3.24 b (1.94, 5.77) N = 216 8.10 (8.07, 10.45) N = 56
DRC 0.39 a (0.26, 0.52) N = 1, 258 1.86 b (1.03, 3.61) N = 252 3.23 (2.45, 4.13) N = 956
Madagascar 0.36 a (0.36, 0.36) N = 1, 847 0.14 b (0.10, 0.57) N = 302 (0 and 7.33) N = 2
Nigeria3 0.54 a (0.40, 0.81) N = 4, 061 6.40 b (5.05, 6.74) N = 372 3.24 (2.70, 3.77) N = 1, 438
Uganda4 0.50 a (0.30, 0.75) N = 653 4.48 b (2.49, 5.97) N = 81 9.55 (7.96, 11.94) N = 229
Zambia 0.40 a (0.30, 0.61) N = 261 9.63 b (3.01, 11.04) N = 83 6.74 (5.72, 6.74) N = 16
  1. ¹ The most popular ACT was chloroquine in Madagascar, and SP in all other countries. The most popular anti-malarial is based on volumes of anti-malarials sold or distributed in the last week, within each country.
  2. 2 Statistical comparisons were conducted between the most popular treatment and the first-line quality-assured ACT. Statistical difference is labelled with superscripts 'a' or 'b'. Estimates with different letters in their superscripts differ significantly from one another within countries (p < 0.01 for all tests).
  3. 3 In Nigeria, price is presented for the first-line quality-assured ACT (AL), rather than the alternate first-line quality-assured ACT (ASAQ). The median price for the alternate first-line treatment in Nigeria is $3.23 (1.89, 4.04) N = 622.
  4. 4 In Uganda the sampled clusters included two areas located in districts that were undertaking a pilot of subsidized ACT in the retail sector [27]. Due to the presence of this pilot, the percent of private sector outlets stocking ACT was somewhat greater in these clusters than in the rest of the sample (50% and 19% respectively). These areas comprised 1.4% of the total sample of private outlets, and while accounting for only 5.4% of the private sector ACT products audited (25 out of 459 ACTs) they accounted for 17% of ACT products once sampling weights are taken into account (these clusters have high weights because they had a relatively low chance of selection under PPS). As in the pilot districts private sector ACT had a much lower price than elsewhere in the country, inclusion of the two pilot clusters can give a distorted picture of the average price available across the country as a whole. Uganda findings are therefore calculated both with and without the subsidized product observations from the 2 clusters for the first-line quality assured treatment. Data in the price table are presented excluding the subsidized product piloted in the clusters. The inclusion of the subsidized products provides a lower price for the first line quality assured treatment of $0.38 (0.38, 4.73) N = 104.