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Fig. 1 | Malaria Journal

Fig. 1

From: The Gini coefficient as a useful measure of malaria inequality among populations

Fig. 1

Exceptionally high global inequality of malaria burden compared with other major public health indices. Gini coefficients of inequality of disease burdens among the six major regions of the world were calculated for eight major public health problems. The world regions are Africa, The Americas, South East Asia, Europe, Western Pacific, and Eastern Mediterranean as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO). Analyses are based on data or estimates extracted from the most recent fact sheets or world reports, or Global Health Estimates by WHO (listed in Additional file 1: Table S1). Malaria, HIV, and tuberculosis (TB) estimates represent new infections in 2018 [4, 15, 16], while Hepatitis C estimates represent new infections in 2015 [17]. For the four non-communicable diseases with highest mortality, different types of estimates are used as examples: diabetes estimates were based on prevalence in adults in 2014 [18], cancer estimates refer to new cases in the year of 2018 [19], while estimates for cardiovascular and respiratory disease refer to attributable deaths in 2016 [20]. The inequality of malaria burden was higher than for the other indices, as shown by the Gini coefficient estimates (with 95% bootstrap confidence intervals)

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