Open Access

Erratum to: Monitoring the operational impact of insecticide usage for malaria control on Anopheles funestus from Mozambique

  • Sonia LR Casimiro1,
  • Janet Hemingway2,
  • Brian L Sharp3 and
  • Michael Coleman2, 3Email author
Malaria Journal20087:8

https://doi.org/10.1186/1475-2875-7-8

Received: 07 January 2008

Accepted: 09 January 2008

Published: 09 January 2008

The original article was published in Malaria Journal 2007 6:142

Since publication of our article [1], we have been made aware of several errors in our article.

In the Background section, paragraph 4, the first sentence "Pyrethroids, although an excellent insecticide class for controlling malaria, are only available in formulations with an accredited residual life of up to four months" should read "Pyrethroids, although an excellent insecticide class for controlling malaria, are only available in formulations with an accredited residual life of between 3 to 6 months [2]."

In the Background section, paragraph 4, the last sentence "As pyrethroid resistance has been selected, several control programmes, including Angola, South Africa, Mozambique and Zambia have reverted back to using DDT." should read "As pyrethroid resistance has been selected, several control programmes, including South Africa and Mozambique have reverted back to using DDT. Where cross-resistance occurs as in Equatorial Guinea alternative insecticide groups are being used."

In the Background section, paragraph 5, the last sentence "The only confirmed report in African Anopheles of kdr outside West Africa comes from Kenya, where a different mutation occurs changing the same amino acid residue in the sodium channel [11]." should read "Until recently, the only confirmed report in African Anopheles of kdr outside West Africa came from Kenya, where a different mutation occurs changing the same amino acid residue in the sodium channel [11]."

In the Results section, paragraph 2, the first sentence "Five of the twenty sites (Benfica, Boane..." should read"Six of the sixteen sites (Benfica, Boane...".

In the Results section, paragraph 3, "Significant increase in pyrethroid resistance was detected in Benfica, Boane, Catuane, Chokwe and Moamba (p < 0.05). Other sites, e.g. Mahotas, also showed increases in pyrethroid resistance, although the significance of the rise is unknown as the sample sizes (n < 30) were low. A significant decrease (P < 0.001) in pyrethroid resistance was recorded at Catuane, where baseline mortality was 72.7% which increased to 100% susceptibility in 2006." should read "Significant decreases in pyrethroid resistance were detected in Benfica, Boane, Catuane, Chokwe and Moamba (p < 0.05). Other sites, e.g. Mafambisse, showed increases in pyrethroid resistance, although the significance of the rise is unknown as the sample sizes (n < 30) were low."

In addition the legend of Table 1 should read.
Table 1

WHO susceptibility test results on 1–3 day old F1 An. Funestus from 16 localities in Mozambique 2006 data with Chi square comparisons to 6 of the study sites from the original 1999 base line survey. (- No data available)

Locality

Latest data 2002 to 2006

Base line data from 1999

 

Lambda-Cyhalothrin (0.05%)

Delta-methrin (0.05%)

Bendiocarb (0.01%)

DDT (4%)

Lambda-Cyhalothrin (0.05%)

Delta-methrin (0.05%)

Bendiocarb (0.01%)

 

n

M

n

M

n

M

n

M

n

M

n

M

n

M

Benfica

240

94

138

90

220

99

-

-

19

100a

16

43.8b

16

100a

Boane

426

92

25

96

372

98

-

-

741

46.2b

302

98.2a

449

97.3a

Catuane

34

100

-

-

-

-

-

-

44

72.7b

-

-

-

-

Chibuto

48

100

-

-

59

100

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Chokwe

131

84

-

-

108

96

-

-

12

100a

-

-

16

100a

Costa dol Sol

70

81

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Ferroviario

21

76

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Infulene

14

100

-

-

38

100

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Luis Cabral

20

90

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Mafambisse

139

95

-

-

149

95

68

100

23

100a

11

-

22

100a

Magude Sede

238

88

-

-

150

100

23

100

-

-

-

-

-

-

Mahotas

55

96

17

88

33

99

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Matola

261

90

-

-

209

100

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Moamba

29

83

25

96

-

-

-

-

87

75a

109

83.5a

-

-

Motaze

435

83

-

-

300

97

14

100

-

-

-

-

-

-

Xinavane

23

83

-

-

12

100

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

M = percentage mortality a = p > 0.1 b = p < 0.001

Table 1. WHO susceptibility test results on 1–3 day old F1 An. funestus from 16 localities in Mozambique 2006 data with Chi square comparisons to six of the study sites from the original 1999 base line survey. (- No data available)

The corrected version of Table 1 is given here.

We apologize for any inconvenience or confusion that this may have caused.

Notes

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
National Institute of Health
(2)
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
(3)
Malaria Research Programme, Medical Research Council

References

  1. Casimiro S, Hemingway J, Sharp B, Coleman M: Monitoring the operational impact of insecticide usage for malaria control on Anopheles funestus from Mozambique. Malaria Journal. 2007, 6: 142-10.1186/1475-2875-6-142.PubMed CentralView ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. WHO Pesticides Evaluation Scheme. [http://www.who.int/whopes/quality/en/]

Copyright

© Casimiro et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2008

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.

Advertisement